Snippets

Snippets

Experimenting with a new format and combining two days into one post: a first, and a sign that both on- and off-farm lives have been stacked full this week.  There's so much to share.  More prose coming soon :)

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Everything by the minutes

Everything by the minutes

8:30 am.  University of Oregon Duck Store.  I'm buying two cases of Listo grease pencils for marking flags with planting dates and varieties at the farm.  We've tried "permanent" markers (they fade), China pencils (they break), and yellow crayon-like grease markers (they don't show up).  Now we have a seemingly endless supply that do the trick.

9:20 am. Strawberry patch.  I'm poking around the plants while Michael weed whacks the end of the bed so we can hook up irrigation lines.  All three patches have been swallowed up on either side by tall cover crop, and I'd almost forgotten about them.  To my delight, they're ripe!  I pick one deep red one and pop it into my mouth, stem and all.  I almost forget to taste it while I search through the beds, looking to see how many are ready.  But then I do, and stand there for a minute, letting that ultra sweet summer flavor sink in.  This sensation will keep coming until fall sets in.

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Evolving visions

Evolving visions

My goals for Wild Heart Botanicals are constantly evolving.  The idea of starting an herb farm was in the back of my mind for years, and it got a jump start when my friend Dana and I started brainstorming herbal business possibilities in 2015.  She'd been training as a midwife and postpartum doula and had been thinking about making herbal products for women's reproductive health.  I mostly wanted to grow herbs, but I'd been studying the ethnobotany of women's health after graduate school and was keen on putting it into practice.  So, we got as far as forming a name and throwing lots of ideas around, and then she realized there were too many unknowns in her immediate future to commit to a business.  Though I would've loved to have a partner, I just kept running with it on my own.

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Moving day for medicinals

Moving day for medicinals

They sat sadly in pots for too many days during that unexpected move, until I found time before and after work to clear out quack grass and irises from a small plot next to the farm stand.  They've survived, shaded by an almond and a hazelnut tree against the shed, for two seasons in that little garden.  They've ignited customers' curiosity and been part of a few medicinal plant workshops I've led for youth farmers and interns.  I've also harvested several of them, lovingly at the peak of their summertime vitality, to make tinctures or salves.  Despite all this though, they've remained pretty sad.  There's just not enough light in that little sliver of garden.

So today I decided to give some of my favorite herbs a new home in my sunny plot at the Whiteaker Community Garden in Eugene.

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