Market zone, part three

Market zone, part three

Although I was much more in and out of Market Zone than I am during normal weeks, I was still in it enough to continue the story from Part One and Part Two:

The stand is up.  This week, we miraculously finish with 10-15 minutes to spare, so everyone jumps in help weigh out zucchinis, carrots, beets, and cauliflower for restaurant orders.  We keep regular accounts with 100 Mile Bakery in downtown Springfield, as well as Ciao Pizza on Gateway Road, and I pretty much always end up filling them last-minute once the market is ready.  We choose the highest quality bunches, best looking zucchini, and throw in a few extra leaves of spinach rather than risk short-changing them.  On the one hand, these types of orders would be the best candidates to get imperfect produce, since they'll chop it up and cook it before anyone else sees it, but I tend to reserve the highest quality for them since a) they order reliably every week, b) we're selecting it for them-- they don't have the opportunity to choose between bunches like our market customers, c) they could start ordering from other farms if our quality lags, and d) there's just a degree of professionalism and quality that exists in the industry, and I want us to stand out. 

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Market zone, part one

I hardly see the farm or get to work with the crew on Thursdays.  I'm at the warehouse mid morning to pick up the market truck, leftover CSA totes, and a road sign to set out near the hospital.  By eleven o'clock, I'm usually arriving at the farm, saying a quick hello to whoever might be washing produce up front, then diving into what I call "market zone".  It's a fun zone, and it feels entirely separate from the workings of the farm despite being intimately reliant on them.

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